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The Network of Women in Media, India, is an association which aims to provide a forum for women in media professions to share information and resources, exchange ideas, promote media awareness and ethics, and work for gender equality and justice within the media and society. Local groups linked to the NWMI are currently functioning in 16 centres across the country.


 

Marouf GaziSrinagar-based independent journalist Marouf Gazi, 26, has been conferred the Third NWMI Fellowship (2019), instituted to support women journalists working in various kinds of challenging situations.

This year, the NWMI received 28 excellent applications from Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jammu and Kashmir, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Odisha, Tamil Nadu and Uttarakhand. The applicants belonged to various minorities, marginalized communities like Adivasis and Dalits, and also represented a range of media forms – print, online, television, radio and community media. Most of the applicants live and work in remote areas and in very challenging political and economic situations. All of them highlighted the difficulties of pursuing journalism as a career due to gender and other barriers.

The NWMI expresses concern over the order of the High Court of Meghalaya holding Patricia Mukhim and Shobha Chaudhuri of contempt of its court and imposing a fine of Rs 2 lakh to be paid within two weeks. This order, if carried out, could not only result in the intimidation of the individuals concerned but could also deter freedom of expression and threaten press freedom in the country as a whole.

Priyanka Dubey Chameli Devi Jain awardOn March 9, 2019, NWMI member Priyanka Dubey, bilingual correspondent with the BBC, Delhi, received the Chameli Devi Jain Award for an Outstanding Woman Journalist for the year 2018.

The jury comprising Bharat Bhushan, former editor, Sheela Bhatt, National Editor, (News) NewsX, and Vandita Mishra, National Opinion Editor, The Indian Express, said “Her news reports take up the burning and complex social and political issues of our times, helping uncover the reality underlying them showing them to be layered, complex, and variegated."

Network of Women in Media, India and Gender at Work jointly conducted a survey of media houses’ responses to the issue of sexual harassment. The survey was filled by 456 women (including cis women, transwomen and gender fluid individuals), working in print, electronic, online media, radio, on a full-time, part-time, contract, stringer or freelance basis. It also included journalism educators, trainers and researchers. It was filled in English, Hindi, Telugu and Tamil. HIghlights from the survey:
The Network of Women in Media, India, a forum for women media professionals from across the country, seeks to support promising women journalists working in challenging situations, remote areas or conflict zones, often without regular pay or proper equipment. Young women from Adivasi, Dalit and minority communities face immense hardships while trying to be journalists. Many new entrants to the profession do not have access to professional training or mentoring, and several such struggling journalists are even denied the bylines that could help build up their body of work. Yet, we know they represent a pool of immense talent and commitment to journalism that could bloom, given a little encouragement.
The NWMI concluded its 14th national meeting in New Delhi on 3 February 2019 with a renewed resolve to continue calling upon media organisations, especially decision makers within them, to recognise that gender equality is a fundamental right, and that ensuring inclusive and safe workplaces (within and outside offices), as well as gender aware and balanced coverage of events and issues, are Constitutional obligations that they are duty bound to seriously strive to fulfil.
Making gender count: towards visbility, equity and safety has interviews, reports and personal accounts on the conference theme -- sexual harassment in the workplace. The souvenir also contains a short history of NWMI, its activities, achievements, and highlights of previous conferences.

Manel report Cover Final webAlthough women constitute around half of the human population, their voices and opinions are not proportionately heard in the public sphere. Television news channels in India regularly feature panel discussions with spokespersons and experts to analyse and debate current events and issues, but women are invariably under-represented in these forums. 
NWMI volunteers monitored TV news channels for women’s representation, for one month, covering 28 channels in 12 languages. The report on the Study on the Representation of Women in Indian TV News Channels was released on February 1, 2019.

The NWMI is deeply concerned about the continuing threat to a Guwahati-based woman journalist, and demands that the police take stronger action on her FIR detailing the alleged assault by a reporter of Republic TV.
Journalists need the freedom to investigate and report on stories of public interest –whether illegal sand mining or corrpuption– and hold those in power accountable. A free press, is after all, one of the cornerstones of a democracy, without which it would be reduced to a farce. The NWMI therefore calls upon the Tamil Nadu police to desist from harassing journalists and stop the witch-hunt to which they are being subjected. The BJP must ask its members to cease false propaganda and innuendo against journalists who were doing their job.